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Data: Vehicle Fuel Economy and CO2 Emissions

View all data on this page as  charts |  tables

A. Ford U.S. Corporate Average Fuel Economy

Miles per gallon

 201320142015
Cars (domestic and import)1,236.436.435.8
Trucks325.025.026.2
Combined car and truck fleet29.530.130.0
  •  Third-party rating
  1. Domestic: Includes 1.0 mpg FFV credit.
  2. Import: No FFV’s.
  3. Includes 1.0 mpg FFV credit.

The average fuel economy of our U.S. car fleet declined and U.S. truck fleet increased compared to 2014. In addition, our combined corporate average fuel economy decreased by about 0.1 mpg due to changes in the volume mix. Our combined fleet CO2 emissions improved by 10 percent compared to 2009.

B. Ford U.S. CO2 Tailpipe Emissions per Vehicle (Combined Car and Truck Fleet Average CO2 Emissions)

Grams per mile

201320142015
302297296

Improvement is reflected in decreasing grams per mile for the combined fleet. This is the fourth year that the greenhouse gas (GHG) data has come directly from Ford’s official GHG report. Under the One National Program regulation, 2012 MY was the first year where a separate GHG compliance report was required, in addition to the annual CAFE report. The GHG value includes FFV credits, but does not include credits/debits for air conditioning or off-cycle technologies or CH4/N2O compliance.

C. Ford Europe CO2 Tailpipe Emissions per Passenger Vehicle

Grams per kilometer

 201320142015
Phase in of percent best-CO2-performing vehicles111.51113.91NA
100 percent of vehicles129122118

NA = Not available.

  1. Only 80 percent of the best-CO2-performing fleet vehicles are accounted for in the “phase in” data as part of the European Commission’s phase in plan.

Improvement is reflected in decreasing grams per kilometer. “Phase in” data shows an increase in grams per kilometer from 2013 to 2014 because it includes a higher percentage of the vehicle fleet as directed by the European Commission’s phase in plan and, therefore, includes more vehicles with lower CO2 performance than were included in the 2013 “phase in” data. These figures are based on production data for European markets. European and U.S. fleet CO2 emissions are not directly comparable because they are calculated in different units and because they are assessed based on different drive cycles.

D. Ford Europe CO2 Tailpipe Emissions per Light Commercial Vehicle

Grams per kilometer

201320142015
176.72178.71177.1
  1. 2014 was the start of official CO2 monitoring for light commercial vehicles (N1). Between 2014 and 2017, the phase in rule applied by increasing fleet coverage, starting with lowest CO2 vehicles; starting at 70 percent in 2014, 75 percent in 2015, 80 percent in 2016.
  2. For 2013, final official data from the European Commission (EC) was published in October 2013 for light commercial vehicles (vehicle category N1). For 2013, 70 percent of the best-CO2-performing light commercial vehicles are accounted for in this data as part of the EC’s phase in plan.

Improvement is reflected in decreasing grams per kilometer. These figures are based on production data for European markets. European and U.S. fleet CO2 emissions are not directly comparable because they are calculated in different units and because they are assessed based on different drive cycles.

E. Ford Switzerland CO2 Tailpipe Emissions per Passenger Vehicle

Grams per kilometer

 201320142015
Phase in of percent best-CO2-performing vehicles122.72126.01NA
100 percent of vehicles134135132

NA = Not available.

  1. For 2014, 80 percent of the best-CO2-performing fleet vehicles are accounted for in this data, as part of the Swiss phase in plan.
  2. For 2013, 75 percent of the best-CO2-performing fleet vehicles are accounted for in this data, as part of the Swiss phase in plan.

Improvement is reflected in decreasing grams per kilometer. “Phase in” data shows an increase in grams per kilometer from 2013 to 2014 because it includes a higher percentage of the vehicle fleet as directed by the European Commission’s phase in plan and, therefore, includes more vehicles with lower CO2 performance than were included in the 2013 “phase in” data. CO2 emissions for 100 percent of the vehicle fleet increased from 2013 to 2014 due to an increased percentage of non-diesel vehicles in the overall fleet, an increase in automatic vehicles over manual vehicles and an increase in relatively higher CO2 emission four-wheel-drive vehicles. These figures are based on production data for European markets. European and U.S. fleet CO2 emissions are not directly comparable because they are calculated in different units and because they are assessed based on different drive cycles.